Post Tagged with: "history of medicine"

Figure 1: Egyptian Mummification

Dissecting Anatomy: Past, Present, Future

by Yathu Maheswaran, Features Editor   In the early years of medical education, an inimitable experience will be studying anatomy. For many students, human anatomy can be as fascinating as it is arduous to learn. At the same time, it can be glorious in providing a consistent linguistic basis of medicine, but inglorious when we consider past stigma towards dissection […]

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‘A Year of the Arts’  Reflections from the  UCL Medical Humanities student group

‘A Year of the Arts’ Reflections from the UCL Medical Humanities student group

By Harriet Williams  It is often said that ‘Medicine is both an art and a science’. This phrase can sometimes be used to explain the approach needed to deal with the complex web of interactions, decisions and ethical dilemmas in everyday clinical practice. As I go through medical school and meet patients with a wide variety of ideas, viewpoints and […]

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An Interview with a Sexual Health Doctor – Dr Jonathan Cartledge

An Interview with a Sexual Health Doctor – Dr Jonathan Cartledge

By Anne Tan I was a bit nervous before interviewing Dr Cartledge. This was because aside from being a Sexual Health Consultant Physician, he is also the Academic Lead for Year 5 medical students at University College London. Truth be told, he had already called me out for falling asleep in a lecture earlier this year. Luckily it was a […]

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HIV Need Not Stop You

HIV Need Not Stop You

By Anne Tan Christopher Sandford, 67, is an Elite Controller. This means he is part of an extremely rare group of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive patients whose immune systems can keep viral loads low without anti-retroviral treatment. Sandford has a mutation on the HIV’s co-receptor on the White Blood Cell (WBC), the Co-Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5). This mutation has […]

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Keep Calm and Carry on….the unwinnable war in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?

Keep Calm and Carry on….the unwinnable war in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?

By Anne Tan ‘Keep Calm and Carry on’ was a slogan used by the British government to boost national morale before the start of the Second World War. Rediscovered in 2000, the slogan has now been parodied many times over and has become a British cultural icon in its own right, the mantra of the indomitable British stoicism. But is […]

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Forgetting Smallpox

[box]Oscar To explores how the development of smallpox vaccination led to one of mankind’s greatest victories [/box] As medical students, we may often find that medicine is simply a field to be learnt, where discoveries are to be made by far away researchers holed up in their labs. We are not exposed to the challenges that were once faced generations […]

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Medical Firsts!

Medical Firsts!

[box] Features Editor, Anne Tan, reveals the key building blocks on the road to modern medicine [/box]   The first person to organise medical teaching: Hippocrates (460-370 BC) was the first man to organise medical teaching and make medicine a distinct discipline. He is often seen as the father of western medicine as he revolutionised it. He did so by […]

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