Category: Features

General Top Tips for Freshers

General Top Tips for Freshers

This is the first article in our Freshers series! Check out more in the coming weeks.   Congratulations you made it! All those hours perfecting that personal statement, nervously sitting the dreaded UKCAT, and sweating through the interview have been worth it – you’re now a medical student! Starting university is an exciting new challenge; one that is entirely different to […]

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Jeremy Hunt and the hatred of an entire profession.

The things I do for you, TMS. I suffered through all 25 minutes of listening to Jeremy Hunts King’s speech, Hunt sounding like a five year old reading his brother’s essay and not entirely sure what all the words meant. In phrase bingo, jargon such as ‘intelligent transparency’ came up a whopping six times, and not once did he explain […]

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Medical student? Yes, but human too!

Medical student? Yes, but human too!

It’s a well-known fact that medics are a competitive bunch. We have our own sports teams, come exam time we all brag about how much work we’re doing, and when results are out, we all want to know each other’s decile ranking. Medical school seems to be a competition where not only do you have to study the hardest, but […]

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Healthcare in the developing world; if you want it.

Healthcare in the developing world; if you want it.

By Oscar To Part of visiting any new country is the excitement of discovering a culture that is different to one’s own. Realising that one’s English is full of incomprehensible slang, discovering that a one hour tea break is perfectly acceptable, and how the nearby NGO’s name means ‘fart sex’ in the local language. Travelling the world can lead to […]

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Tourism of poverty- an elective report from Tanzania

Tourism of poverty- an elective report from Tanzania

Oscar continues his feature series with an elective report on Berega hospital, Tanzania. If you would be interested in coming to Berega, do contact him. The room shook as my belated consciousness rose out of a half slumber. As my fears of the future bled out into the seat, as I too shook with the room, I remembered where I […]

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Elective planning

Elective planning

An idiot’s medical student’s guide to organising your elective Case study: medical student lazily completes exams in the apparent hopes of one day being granted the status of a Dr (not to be confused with the Doctor, the title of a time-travelling alien that kidnaps people). However, shortly before their ultimate qualification, they are required to organise a dreaded elective. […]

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Exam stress and how to beat it

Exam stress and how to beat it

Exam stress. We’ve all dealt with it, and it only gets worse the further you get through medical school. One of the very first lectures I had as a first year was coping with stress, and every exam period that goes past brings with it another lecturer mentioning that they thinks we all need to get some rest. Most pre-clinical […]

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The birth of every child is momentous even if not all make the headlines

The birth of every child is momentous even if not all make the headlines

[box] Anne Tan reflects from the Labour Ward on the week of the Royal birth[/box] Babies are born every day but it is not every day that a baby’s birth headlines the news. Perhaps this is because not every baby is born to the future king of a country. Last weekend Princess Charlotte of Cambridge’s arrival made news headlines across the world. […]

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‘A Year of the Arts’  Reflections from the  UCL Medical Humanities student group

‘A Year of the Arts’ Reflections from the UCL Medical Humanities student group

By Harriet Williams  It is often said that ‘Medicine is both an art and a science’. This phrase can sometimes be used to explain the approach needed to deal with the complex web of interactions, decisions and ethical dilemmas in everyday clinical practice. As I go through medical school and meet patients with a wide variety of ideas, viewpoints and […]

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What does it mean to be a Speech and Language Therapist in a Neonatal Unit?

What does it mean to be a Speech and Language Therapist in a Neonatal Unit?

By Naomi Proszynska Whilst it may not seem obvious, given the title of the role, Speech and Language Therapists (SALTs) are trained in the treatment of eating, drinking, and swallowing difficulties. In fact this makes up a significant proportion of the work they do. Given that supporting clients with communication difficulties or swallowing difficulties requires expertise in the anatomy and […]

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